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We’ve all thought in the back of our minds that possibly our own smart phones, cameras and tv could possibly be used to spy on us, (ok, well maybe I’m the only paranoid one) but now that little thought may be a lot more real than we thought.

WikiLeaks has set off an avalanche of alarming headlines with its publication of purported CIA documents.

Allegations that the U.S. agency has hacked into smartphones, laptops, and internet-connected TVs to spy on people around the world are enough to make anyone paranoid.

But security experts are urging tech consumers to keep calm and take a few simple precautions. The document dump reveals nothing terribly new or surprising in technical terms, the experts say. Mobile spy tools have been around for years.

“That the CIA hacks is like saying water is wet — it’s them doing their job,” said Nicholas Weaver, senior researcher with the International Computer Science Institute at the University of California, Berkeley.

The WikiLeaks publication serves as a reminder that anyone with a smartphone or another device connected to the internet is vulnerable to hacking.

Related: Your data is not safe. Here’s how to lock it down

“No computer system is impenetrable,” said Shuman Ghosemajumder, chief technology officer with cyber security firm Shape Security. “Given enough time, effort, and resources, a nation-state or even a well-funded cybercriminal group is capable of compromising almost any popular system we think of as secure.” READ MORE

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